More information – Más información

Where:
Wire Cutter Oral History Center
c/o ADAPT of Texas
1640-A East Second Street, Suite 1
Austin, Texas 78702
info@wirecuttertexas.org
virginia@wirecuttertexas.org
The office is at the Northwest corner of East Second and Chalmers Street.

Who:
Meet the people who make up Wire Cutter.

What:
Please see this October 2011 post for one view.

How:
Wire Cutter listens to the lived experiences of people, informed by feminist and person-centered oral history and ethnography. It also asks critical question, observes what’s going on, and conducts archival research. Wire Cutter also offers workshops in writing, public speaking, and using oral history for social justice.

Antecedents:
Wire Cutter receives its principal support — material, emotional, and political — from ADAPT of Texas. Thank you, ADAPT!!!

Wire Cutter is part of Groundswell: Oral History for Social Change, an emerging and dynamic network of oral historians, activists, cultural workers, community organizers, and documentary artists.

Wire Cutter would not exist without libraries, ethnic studies, and what some call “people’s history.”

In listening to people (or “conducting oral histories”), Wire Cutter continues, in some ways, and expands, in other ways, the work of the Texas After Violence Project. Virginia Raymond, Wire Cutter blog administrator, brainstormed with Walter C. Long, founder of the Texas After Violence Project, for two years before the project’s incorporation in April 2007 and the opening of its office in June 2007. The project hired Virginia as its first director, a position in which she served until September 2, 2011. Virginia left the Texas After Violence Project, involuntarily and sadly, long before she had finished her work there; she left, however, immeasurably and permanently enriched by the experiences and critical thinking of both her colleagues and the narrators who shared their first-hand experiences.

The oral history work of Wire Cutter will necessarily draw from the insights Virginia gained through her work with the Texas After Violence Project, as it will also draw from the experiences, ideas, and questions of other contributors and colleaguesWire Cutters.

!Mil gracías!